Crimean War Essay

Crimean War Essay-4
The officers of these units seemed to enjoy the pomp-and-circumstance of the parade-ground more than they understood the mechanics of war.The troops were, nonetheless, highly disciplined units.

The officers of these units seemed to enjoy the pomp-and-circumstance of the parade-ground more than they understood the mechanics of war.The troops were, nonetheless, highly disciplined units.

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In addition, Great Britain and France maintained a naval presence in the Baltic Sea, which forced Russia to divert troops from the Crimea for the defense of St. There is no simple explanation for the cause of the Crimean War.

The motives and ambitions of a few individuals drew Russia into conflict with several nations, cost the lives of hundreds of thousands of men, and reshaped the political structure of Europe for the next fifty years.

Of particular interest to Great Britain was the maintenance of open trade or access routes to India and the East which meant preventing Russian expansion to the Mediterranean Sea.

One could easily suggest that the Crimean War resulted from many misplayed hands due to poor decisions based on shifting allegiances and insufficient understanding of the different motives of each nation.

Contributing to the belligerency of both Russia and Turkey was the international support that each nation presumed it could rely on.

Concerns about the shift in the balance of power in Europe and the overt motives of the tsar brought Great Britain, France, Austria, and even Sardinia into the conflict.Consequently, there were few battle-hardened veterans among the British forces in the Crimea.During this time, drastic measures were taken to reduce the cost of supporting a standing army.His accounts of the difficulties of the soldier's life in Balaklava struck a responsive chord with readers on the home front.Thomas Agnew, of the publishing house Thomas Agnew & Sons, sensed a commercial opportunity.Roger Fenton's Crimean War photographs represent one of the earliest systematic attempts to document a war through the medium of photography.Fenton, who spent fewer than four months in the Crimea (March 8 to June 26, 1855), produced 360 photographs under extremely trying conditions.The British government made several official attempts to document the progress of the war through the relatively new medium of photography.In March of 1854 an amateur photographer, Gilbert Elliott, photographed views of the fortresses guarding Wingo Sound in the Baltic Sea from aboard the Hecla, the same ship that was to carry Fenton to the Crimea eleven months later.Fenton in 1944, including his most well-known photograph, "Valley of the Shadow of Death." This set of unmounted photographs may be unique in that it appears to reflect an arrangement imposed by Fenton, or the publisher, Thomas Agnew & Sons, and yet is a set of prints that was not issued on the standard mounts sold by the publisher.It is possible that this collection is comprised of a set of prints kept and annotated by Fenton himself.

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